CLOUD COMPUTING

Cloud Manifesto: Who's Behind it?

Mar 26, 2009 04:02 pm | IT News
The News Guy

by John Dodge

The "Cloud Manifesto" is shrouded in mystery. What is it? Whose behind it? And why was Microsoft told to sign it with no input?

IDG News Service’s terrific story cites a blog post by one Steven Martin (not the "wild and crazy" one) complaining that Microsoft was told `you vill sign zee papers’ without modification. Martin might rightfully argue for openness, but Microsoft’s heavy-handed history and tardiness to cloud game makes it no surprise that it was told to sign and shut up.

Elizabeth Montalbano’s story explores much of the intrigue behind Microsoft’s motives for going public. Perhaps Martin thought everyone would see the inherent unfairness by the manifesto’s authors. Did Karl Marx show pass around his manifesto for review before he published it? I doubt it.

Just for kicks, I looked up "manifesto" in a copy of "The Concise Oxford Dictionary" given to me many years ago by IBM and bearing its logo (what a coincidence?). It says "declaration of policy by sovereign state, state, political party…" Microsoft complaining isn’t exactly akin to the citizenry getting shut out of the debate.

In searching "Cloud Manifesto," Google only returned the stories about Microsoft’s reaction. However, I searched IBM's site just on a hunch and found the "Architectural manifesto: An introduction to the possibilities (and risks) of cloud computing" which discusses the cloud layers and risks. It was posted on Feb. 2 and the author appears to be one Mikko Kontio with a .fi email address (Finish) at a company called Softera.

It’s pretty general, but serves as great introduction to the cloud. It’s hard to see what irked Martin about this manifesto. It did, however, briefly address "vendor lock in." Hmmm.

Like the IBM dictionary, Kontio’s manifesto may just be a coincidence too. If the document that tweeked Martin is so secret, why would be it sitting there in public view on IBM’s web site? But the word "manifesto" doesn’t get used that often. In any event, I’ve pinged Mikko by email to see if his cloud manifesto is the same one irking Microsoft’s Martin.

The "Cloud Manifesto" that Martin reviewed reportedly addresses interoperability between cloud networks.